Newly Acquired OCD

28 Mar 2014

From my personal experience, when my mother was sick, I became obsessive about a lot of things. After her death, my behavior continued for a short period of time. Before going to bed, I had to check to see if all of my mother’s possessions and all of the things she had given me were in their proper places. I had to tell my dad that I loved him, bid him goodnight and promise him that I would see him tomorrow. I was afraid that if I forgot to say one of those things something would go terribly wrong. If I didn’t act on these impulses I couldn’t sleep.

 The risk of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) increases in people who are related to others with OCD. A study funded by the National Institutes of Health examined DNA suggests that OCD may be associated with an uncommon mutation of the human serotonin transporter gene (hSERT). More recent studies have also shown that there are certain triggers and factors that can enable a sudden onset of OCD, such as behavioral, cognitive, and environmental factors. In fact, a death of a family member or loved one is considered as an environmental factor that can contribute to OCD.

After a loved one’s death, one can develop different fears that can develop into extreme cases of OCD. Fears that can develop include: fear of death, abandonment, or just fear of life events in general. I drove myself insane, but over time the urges faded and I calmed down. One way that helped me reduce my anxiety over my fear was to imagine what would realistically happen if I didn’t act on the impulse. For example, were I to not check to make sure my mother’s brown leather belt was pushed to the left side of the drawer, would anything terrible occur? In such a situation, the chief thing to do is reason with yourself. This can be difficult, as you might feel an obligation or a need to perform an action. If you believe you can’t do it on your own, seek professional help. There are different treatments offered and available medications to help you reduce your anxiety and get over any obsessive fears. Calm will come eventually.

Obsessive compulsive disorder, OCD, is developed by people who are related to someone with OCD. A study funded by the National Institutes of Health examined DNA suggests that OCD may be associated with an uncommon mutation of the human serotonin transporter gene (hSERT). Later studies have also shown that there are certain triggers and factors that can enable a sudden onset of OCD, such as behavioral, cognitive, and environmental factors. A death of a family member or loved one is considered as an environmental factor that can contribute to OCD.

References:

http://www.ocdeducationstation.org/ocd-facts/what-causes-ocd




Follow us on Instagram!